The Royal Fanzine

The Royal Fanzine is a kaleidoscope of royal-themed creativity and diversity founded by Ashley Michael, Marcia Tracy, and Natalia Corbalan.

The Royal Fanzine is a kaleidoscope of royal-themed creativity and diversity founded by Ashley Michael, Marcia Tracy, and Natalia Corbalan. Marcia Tracy is the reigning Editor-in-Chief and "voice" of the 'Zine.

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Recent Tweets @TheRoyalFanzine

anothergracekellyblog:

Just received this email from Ellen Sheehan, Director of the Grace Kelly Museum:
Hi Sheila,
Great to hear from you. The Grace Kelly museum is located in East Falls at the Falls Center, 3300 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19129. This is the former site of the…

Hate to burst your bubble here, but I have 1000x doubt on this being even remotely legitimate. I mean REALLLY Doubt it. There’s nothing on the web about a Grace Kelly Museum even remotely being possible or even in the works on the web or in the news, and  3300 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19129 is an office building for the Philadelphia VNA (Visiting Nurses Association), The Eye Institute at Falls Center, Eastern University, The Barber National Institute, The Center for Grieving Children, Angora Learning Center, Eastern University Charter School, St. Christopher’s Care Center at Falls Center, PA Dialysis Clinic, Falls Center and the office of The Philadelphia Alliance, Les Petits Cherbs Daycare, Gatehouse Cafe, Henry Ave Medical Center, PA Hospital Network Board of Directors.

That, and the woman you spoke with is actually a past president of the East Falls Historical Society, not the Grace Kelly Museum. So unless it is still in the infant stages and planning stage, I doubt the “source” 100%.

Princess Estelle’s first day at Äventyret Kindergarten outside Stockholm, 25 August, 2014.

(via anythingandeverythingroyals)


Princess Estelle, accompanied by her parents Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Daniel, went to her first day of pre-school today, August 8, 2014

August 25th…not 8th….

Princess Estelle, accompanied by her parents Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Daniel, went to her first day of pre-school today, August 8, 2014

August 25th…not 8th….

(via anythingandeverythingroyals)

royalwatcher:

Queen Silvia today attending a gala to commerorate the 15th anniversary of the World Childhood Foundation in Konstanz, Germany.

Source: Andreas Rentz/Getty Images Europe

8-23-2014

(via yoursweetremedy)

queendanes:

plot twist: not everyone is obsessed with the same royal you are so stop being a little bitch about it

(via queendanes)

My latest colourization of King George VI

Credit to Bertram Park for this fantastic photograph of His Majesty

(via royal-windsor)

royalcatherine:

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall greet the Duchess’s grandchildren as the pair attend the Ballater Highland Games - 14th August 2014.

(via royallyvintage)

royalwatcher:

More pictures of the Crown Prince and Princess of Norway today to mark the 200th anniversary of the Moss Treaty. The couple attended events today at Moss’ Varket Arena, where the Crown Prince gave a speech.

Crown Prince Haakon’s Speech

Today we stand here together, a few meters from the signing of the important agreement. The King’s difficult decision was the beginning of 200 years of peace between the Nordic countries. Today, 200 years later, Moss is quite different, and Norway are quite different. But I still think that we who are here today have much in common with those who sat in convention garden that day, or worked here at the ironworks.

As 200 years ago, we all have choices; large and small, every day. The choices says something about who we are. Many of you here today are young people who have traveled to Moss for example Cuba, Israel, Palestine, Guatemala, Sweden, Russia, South Africa and USA. It says that you are interested in some of the most important: getting together, see each other, learn from each other, respect each other’s differences, identify the common human heart of us.

All this I experienced when I met young people at the seminar Youth Action and earlier today, where they also worked on issues such as peace building and conflict resolution in practice.

Here we have much to learn. Even though the Nordic region has benefited from 200 years of peace between our countries, this is not obvious. When we look at the world and know our own history, we know how fragile peace can be. But peace is about more than avoiding war. Fred is about building communities.

When this year we are celebrating the Constitution, we celebrate some choices we have made ​​together - how we have chosen to build the Norwegian society:

We have decided that no one should have the power alone. Those who govern the country, gets its power by the people.

We have emphasized freedom of speech and freedom of religion. We should be able to say and believe what we want.

And we are concerned that no one should be afraid to be themselves. And within reason, no one could threaten you to think and be something other than what you want.

These values ​​do not work by themselves, and we must work for them continuously. Often put the pressure on, and some people unfortunately they do not always work as they should. But luckily there are values ​​we daily work and see the results of. Sometimes it can be difficult to make good and wise choices - of a society, and on its own behalf. Especially when we have been exposed to any harm. Fortunately not all choices as severe as the king took here in Moss, but most of what we do impacts eventually other people.

The Norwegian society today is different from what we had in 1814 in several ways. We have got a high standard of living, there is less difference between rich and poor, and we build our country on values ​​that the Constitution laid the foundations for - but that was largely unknown in people’s lives for 200 years. Most of us have choices.

***

Norway is also part of the world, perhaps even more than in 1814, we affect the world and it affects us. We can not set ourselves away from the world community. We enjoy trading, exciting destinations, and tourists who come to see the Norwegian nature. But the conflicts and challenges affecting us - for example when we notice the global refugee situation and increased terror alert.

When I meet young people on peace seminar here in Moss looks, I still feel like the future! We have much more in common than divide us. When I travel around Norway and in other countries, I always see traces of this. I believe in the immense power of young people working together. To have the potential of young people - including those that fall slightly outside, and allowing them to make good choices about building a good society. That way we can create independent people - which can also lead others. I have met many of those leaders:

  • For example, 18 year old Jasmin from Tromsø, who had been bullied as long as she could remember, but that did help to stop it in 9th grade. She started an anti-bullying project - so that others will experience the same as her.
  • Or Pamela farmer in Zambia - who was a single mother of four, but still had failed to provide any education by ensuring that the small soil stain gave her enough income by growing a new, more robust and sustainable manner.
  • Or 17 year old Malala from Pakistan who was shot by the Taliban because she talked and wrote about girls’ right to education. She is a role model for many and are currently being listened to by world leaders.
All these have taken bold choices that affect others and that allows us to live together despite differences. And the peacemakers. For peace is about building communities.
***
Back to the young man up in Verksgata. King Christian Frederik means that no more than 27 years on August day. His nerves are in shambles. He carries a heavy burden. He doubts.
Today we know what he chose: he ended the war, despite the fact that he had his own government against them. We got Convention of Moss, which formed the basis for a peaceful union with Sweden - the one we had until 1905.
Throughout the proceedings he contributed to saving the Norwegian Constitution, and created largely foundations for the society we have today. He doubted his way to the result - as we often do in our main choices. And although we may not experience the fateful in our choices so clearly, we can choose the right thing for ourselves and for others. Every day.
Thank you.

Source: Kongehuset

(via leonorelilianmaria)